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No Nightstand, No Problem: Unusual Things to Use Instead

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(Image credit: My Domaine)

What is a nightstand, anyway? Of course we all know what the pieces identified as nightstands at the furniture store look like: little tables, usually with a drawer or shelf. But all a nightstand really is, at its most basic, is a place to put the stuff you may want immediately before you go to bed or right after you get up, so you don't have to lean over awkwardly and pick up your iPhone from the floor. Realizing this, lots of clever folks have repurposed all kinds of non-nightstandy things as nightstands. Here are 12 of our favorite examples.

A Stack of Vintage Suitcases

Above: The home of actress Constance Zimmer via My Domaine shows just how fun it can look to play with furnishings and shake things up. She was lacking a nightstand on one side of her bed, and thought it might be a good idea to cozy up the place by bringing in a handful of the vintage suitcases she's been collecting for years.

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(Image credit: Lily)

A Trunk

A old trunk used as a nightstand has a cool, old-world vibe — and think of all the stuff you could stash in there! Seen here in a bedroom from Lily, via SF Girl by Bay.

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(Image credit: Bo Bedre)
 

A Chair

If you think about it (and I hope this doesn't make your head hurt too much), a chair already is a nightstand anyway: every chair is essentially a short little table with a back on it. So the chair-as-nightstand isn't too much of a stretch, although it might be advisable to mount bedside lamps on the wall (as seen here), owing to the fact that some chair seats aren't perfectly flat (and to save on chair seat real estate). Image from Bo Bedre, via SF Girl by Bay.

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(Image credit: Design Sponge)

A Drum

Drum as nightstand: funny, cheeky, and, if you can find one at a thrift store, cheaper than buying traditional furniture. Spotted on Design*Sponge.

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Portable Walk-In Closets & 14 Other Ways to Make a Studio Feel Like a Mansion

Article by SA Rogers, filed under Furniture & Decor in the Design category

A lot of the most impressive space-saving ideas really only work for wealthier urbanite apartment owners who can simply hire a contractor to design a bunch of customized built-ins. The results – like beds that lower from the ceiling at the push of a button – are often undeniably cool and effective, but not exactly accessible to most of us. For the renter with an average income, tiny space hacks need to be cheaper and way more portable. Here are 15 ideas that are either commercially available for less than the price of your first-born child, or could serve as inspiration for something to build yourself.

Fold-Up Walk-In Wardrobe

 

How luxurious must it feel to have the kind of walk-in closet full of beautiful wooden built-in shelves and drawers, with space to organize all of your shoes, accessories and clothing? Hosun Ching applies this concept to a fold-out wardrobe with additional storage in the doors, transforming into a sort of portable walk-in. There are mirrors on both sides, too, so you can see your outfits from every angle.

“The depth of a standard wardrobe is 60cm,” says Ching. “That is simply not practical, because it means that you literally lose sight of your clothing; and what you don’t see, you don’t wear. The Walk-In Closet is a small storage unit designed to solve this problem. The focus is on organization and visibility. There are drawers for accessories and the reduced depth does away with those ‘hidden’ stacks.”

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